Break or cut?

hello alan,

may I ask for an explanation this:

Test No. [color=blue]incompl/inter-22 “Cross Questions”, question 7

Jane: Sorry you can protest if you like but it doesn’t .

(a) break any ice with me
(b) cut any ice with me
© freeze any ice with me
(d) make any ice with me

Test No. [color=blue]incompl/inter-22 “Cross Questions”, answer 7

Jane: Sorry you can protest if you like but it doesn’t cut any ice with me.

Correct answer: (b) cut any ice with me

I marked break because there?s quite the same saying in german. “breaking the ice”. it seemes logical to me to break ice not to cut it.
is it a special expression to " CUT THE ICE"?
please, explain!

many thanks

Dear Naufragis,
with Alan taking a short summer break it’s my turn to answer your interesting question:
That doesn’t cut any ice with me means that doesn’t impress me at all. As for the origin of that phrase - we’ll see what Alan says when he returns to England - but I guess it refers to the old-time custom of cutting ice blocks and storing them in icehouses. You obviously need a sharp knife to cut ice - a blunt blade won’t get the job done.
So, when someone tries to accomplish something by using ineffective methods you might say: ‘That doesn’t cut any ice with me.’[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEIC listening, photographs: A picnic[YSaerTTEW443543]

hello torsten,

thank you. now it?s logical to me that someone who hasn?t “a sharp knife” cant persuade me to believe in untenable facts.