bewitched

1a. You are bewitched.
1b. You are only of those bewitched.
2a. He sent Raman against them from Delhi to avenge his father’s death.
2b. He sent against them Raman from Delhi to avenge his father’s death.
Please correct the above.
Thanks.

Beeesneees,
Please answer my queries.
Thanks.

Since your question has remained unanswered, I am making an attempt.

1a. You are bewitched.
1b. You are one of those bewitched.
2a. He sent for Raman (from Delhi) to avenge his father’s death.
2b. He sent Raman from Delhi to avenge his father’s death.

Grammatical corrections, as above, are possible, but in the absence of the real context it is difficult to correct the sentences as you may expect.

I infer that someone murdered his innocent father, but he is unable to avenge his father’s death himself, so he has hired or sought the help of Raman.

I don’t understand what you mean by ‘against them’.

Anglophile,
Your assumption is correct.
He sought the help of Raman to revenge them since they killed his father.
In this case, are these sentences OK or not?
2a. He sent Raman against them from Delhi to avenge his father’s death.
2b. He sent against them Raman from Delhi to avenge his father’s death.
please comment.
Thanks.

Not okay.

Anglophile,
Then how can I say it?
Please rephrase them correctly so that I can follow.
Thanks.

I have already recast them under #3 as below.

You have not noted my following observation and provided the actual context.

You haven’t responded to this remark:

Now, what I guessed was this:

  1. He was at a place (XX) and wanted Raman to come to XX to avenge his father’s death, which probably took place at XX.
    OR
  2. He was in Delhi, and sent Raman from there to avenge his father’s death, which probably took place at XX.

You had better ignore ‘against them’ which does not make any good sense. You might mean the murderers, but that phrase is not necessary because it is implied otherwise.