Base vs Basis


#1

What is the difference btw base (noun) and basis (noun) in:

  1. The basis/base of morality/friendship.
    Arguments that have a firm basis/base.
    Rates of work are calculated on a weekly basis/base.
  2. She used her family’s history as a base/basis for her novel.
    His arguments had a sound economic base/basis.

In these cases, “base” and “basis” are interchangeable?

Thanks
K


#2

.
Sentences for “word meanings”
[size=75]http://www.english-test.net/forum/ftopic10990.html#30071[/size]

  1. The basis/base of morality/friendship.
    Arguments that have a firm basis/base.
    Rates of work are calculated on a weekly basis/base.

  2. She used her family’s history as a base/basis for her novel.
    His arguments had a sound economic base/basis.

I’d say no. I prefer basis for all of them.

You can use base as a verb in all but one of the sentences:
[i]- His arguments are firmly based on fact.

  • Their friendship is based on mutual respect.
  • She based her novel on her family’s history.
  • His arguments are based on sound economic theory.[/i]

Amy


#3

Base is generally (but not always) physical, and basis is generally abstract.

It’s abstract, so it should be basis. Base sounds wrong to me there.

It’s abstract, so it should be basis. Base sounds wrong to me there.

It’s abstract, so it should be basis. Base sounds wrong to me there.

It’s abstract, so it should be basis. Base sounds wrong to me there.

It’s abstract, so it should be basis. Base sounds wrong to me there.

No.


#4

Hi Amy,

Please read:

You can use base as a verb in all but one of the sentences:
[i]- His arguments are firmly based on fact.

  • Their friendship is based on mutual respect.
  • She based her novel on her family’s history.
  • His arguments are based on sound economic theory.[/i]

but one of the sentences” means:

For these 4 sentences, the use of the verb “base” is wrong?

Thanks
K


#5

All but one means that in three of the sentences the use of the word base is correct, and in one it is wrong.

However, the statement is wrong, because the verb base can be used, and is used correctly in all those sentences. They can also be put this way:

He bases his arguments firmly on fact.
They base their friendship on mutual respect.
Her novel is based on her family’s history.
He bases his arguments on sound economic theory.


#6

Hi Amy,

:? Right and wrong, wrong and right? :smiley:

So, in short, all of the 4 sentences:

  • His arguments are firmly based on fact.
  • Their friendship is based on mutual respect.
  • She based her novel on her family’s history.
  • His arguments are based on sound economic theory.

are correct in grammar and in meaning.OK?

Thanks
K


#7

I’m not Amy (and Santa Claus is really your parents), but yes, all of those sentences are correct.


#8

Hi Khahn

You wrote [size=150]5[/size] sentences/phrases in your first post and I changed 4 of them and used base as a verb. I changed all but one of your sentences/phrases; I changed 4 out of 5 of yours.

Yes, the 4 that I changed are:

  • His arguments are firmly based on fact.
  • Their friendship is based on mutual respect.
  • She based her novel on her family’s history.
  • His arguments are based on sound economic theory.

These 4 sentences are correct. I wrote them to illustrate how to use base as a verb.

Amy


#9

Hi Yankee, :smiley:

Many thanks for your replies, Yannkee.

Khanh


#10

Just a word of advice, Khann!

You should thank all the people who are helping you. :smiley: Jammie, in this thread, answered three of your questions in detail.

Tom


#11

Yes yes,

Thanks very much for all.

K


#12

The point here is ‘base’ is advised to be used as a verb while "basis’ as a noun. Then how about if base is used as a noun? Generally, how to use them correctly as nouns.
Thanks a lot.


#13

‘base’ as a noun means ‘bottom’:
The base of the plant pot was chipped.
The mountaineers camped at the base of Mount Everest.

or is a term for a specific point:
They decided to make their base camp on the ridge.
The batter ran to third base.