As discussed above: Could you parse the phrase?

As discussed above, there are both management and funding opportunities to enhance program sustainability.
Is there any terminology for the bold phrase?
I know its meaning but I don’t quite understand the grammar point here.
Could you parse the phrase?
How can I make a similar phrases? Or is there any rule to write a similar phrases?

As has already been discussed in the previous paragraph(s).

Thanks Beeesneees!

Is there any rule to omit “has already been” as in the sentence above?
Can I add the subject after “as”?
As it has already been discussed in the previous paragraph(s).

***** NOT A TEACHER *****

Hello, Screen:

“Really” is my favorite word, followed by “as.”

So I thought that you might like this information.

  1. As is well known, this is an age of opportunity.
  2. As has already been stated, his return was the signal for a revolt.
  3. As predicted, the parade was a success. ( = As was predicted, the parade was a success.)

That book explains that the “as” is NOT a conjunction. (So there is no missing subject.) That “as” is a relative pronoun. It means something like “which.” Or: a fact that.


Maybe if we change the order of your sentence, this idea will be more clearly seen:

There are both management and funding opportunites to enhance program sustainability, as ( = which fact) was discussed above.
“Fact” = “There are both management and funding …”

James

Reference: Walter Kay Smart, English Review Grammar (fourth edition), page 141.

Aha, thank you very much James!
To be true, I’ve never known “as” to be a relative pronoun and it’s great to know that. Live and learn!

You are very welcome.

Yes, you are so right: I recently fell down while walking. I learned that I should walk very slowly and watch the sidewalk.

James